Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sign in | Create Account

Machine Shop 6

Duration 46:33

Machine Shop 6 Milling Machine 3

1 Milling Machine 3 Squaring a part, maching all surfaces so they are flat and perpendicular to one another and nominally to the part that will be milled; removing burrs
2 Squaring a Plate Squaring the sides of a part/plate to the dimensions of the finished milled part; remove burrs
3 Using the Edgefinder Used to locate the edge of a part relative to the spindle of the machine
4 Drilling Holes Drill press used to drill holes in parts; center drill milling and other drill bits; setting depth stop

Comments (39)

even if i am making the same mistake it should be pointed out that, since this is an educational video, that you should never put your finger close to any in motion tool, these machine can cut your finger in no time with even more ease then a hot knife in butter

Posted almost 6 years by Anonymous User

Machine Shop 6 Milling Machine 3 1 Milling Machine 3 Squaring a part, maching all surfaces so they are flat and perpendicular to one another and nominally to the part that will be milled; removing burrs 2 Squaring a Plate Squaring the sides of a part/plate to the dimensions of the finished milled part; remove burrs 3 Using the Edgefinder Used to locate the edge of a part relative to the spindle of the machine 4 Drilling Holes Drill press used to drill holes in parts; center drill milling and other drill bits; setting depth stop

Posted almost 6 years by Anonymous User

I would recommend making a new video with safety being a priority.

Posted over 5 years by Anonymous

Whatever one does, whatever precautions one takes, someone somewhere will normally always be there with finger pointed, aghast in indignation at some safety concern or other matter such as a MSC catalog (Coke) in the background instead of a Travers (Pepsi). I have listened to the Machine Shop I -6 and safety was made clear. I am grateful MIT and all parties concerned took the time and effort to make such a wonderful set of instructional videos. If I squirm at the vicinity of a finger to a moving part then all the better. Thanks to everyone who participated and made it possible for a neophyte to indulge and learn from their computer all the way down in Texas.

Posted over 5 years by Anonymous

Noo, that is the LEFT Hand, much space left between finger and cutter

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:07:28

Haha, me too.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:30:28

Yeah, it’s never fun to launch your calipers across the shop by hitting the end hanging off a bench… or mill table.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:26:56

Hehehe..he sure likes that file huh ?

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:17:21

Time for more sawing with that file…

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:17:21

i would hope so!

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:16:38

And he keeps his fingers… This time.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:08:26

Ah! WTF?

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:25:32

Holy crap! Your finger is freekin close to that cutter!

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:07:22

But he has his safety glasses on

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:07:51

maybe he needed a shorter parallell?

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:15:22

I think He wants to simultaineously cut his fingernails too!

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:07:24

That’s MIT editing for you.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:25:32

Yay! He made a cube!

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:17:42

He’s patient

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:26:46

if you have to file the top of the part you might want to sharpen your tool

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:09:11

He didn’t hammer it in this time

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:22:13

it has a high enough aspect ratio where the vise would not lift it enough to matter

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:22:13

When filing it is usually good practice to move the file only in the cutting direction when it is in contact with the part to be filed as the file will last longer, however aluminum is pretty soft so in this case it might not matter.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:08:55

It has ben ny experience to not take quite the full amount on the first pass as it may be a hair too much especailly when cutting dry things tend to warm up and expand a little. I would take about 52 thousands then pull the part double check it and take the remaining 4 or less… thousands on a second pass ;) unless your in a hurry.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:23:23

notice where he laid the claiper, akways remember to close it when laying it anywhere near flying chips… like from filing, bruching, or milling otherwise chips may get into the workings of the caliper itself and will make it useless :(

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:26:48

I’ve shortened many a chip brush by doing that LOL

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:30:21

And sometimes a chip or two will fall back into the hole you are drilling so that when you bring the quill down the drill tip will ‘float’ on that chip and not drill without more downward force applied.

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:37:55

could at least use a pointer

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:08:21

in a magic place ghkl

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:08:26

Is that so he doesn’t get blood in his eyes

Posted 4 years by Anonymous 00:08:04

A little lube goes a long way!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:38:49

Good advice on the need to present the work piece to the fixed jaw of the vise so as to avoid rocking. I have found that the use of a simple length of round stock with a single flat along its length serves as an acceptable pusher tool to get the first three sides squre to each other. A 6" length of spring steel(banding strapping) bent to hold the parallel in place helps to constrain that first between the jaws or a parallel keeper if you have an extra $60. Just some time-tested shop critique: I don’t like reaching in and working around a sharp tool while in the task of setting up the work piece. It subjects the operator to undue risk of injury. Always keep about 6 inches of space from a mounted, sharp (stationary)tool for freedom of injury-free hand movement. I’ve got at least one nice scar to prove that theory. I’d use a roughing end mill or face milling cutter to start out squaring it up as it doesn’t beat up the machine spindle bearings as fast as a single point fly cutter will when roughing and it keeps the decibel levels down in the shop as well especially for heavy cuts. Another good rule of thumb is to retract that quill up to the minimum amount to allow the otherwise inherently less than rigid knee mill to retain what little rigidity yu have to begin with. Again, reducing shock/vibration and lengthening the life of the machine tool as was the point of suggesting a multi-flute cutter to perform the roughing work. I’m not sure if the quill stop-nut was even used for each heavy cut but when taking a heavy cut with a standard helical end mill it can allow the helical “screw” based geometry to pull itself down while in a cut even with the quill lock snugged. Trust me, I’ve done it. Other than those critique points the bases were covered well and this shop training venue is indeed a great idea!

Posted over 3 years by pantognoni

I’ve got audio in the previous videos but in this one I get robotic, tiny and difficult to understand sound

Posted over 3 years by Anonymous

are those calipers getting blasted with chips?

Posted over 3 years by JOE scavone 00:26:04

now he sweeps the chips on the calipers

Posted over 3 years by JOE scavone 00:26:25

Also shows quill deflection why you dont use guill extended to mill

Posted 3 years by Anonymous 00:31:05

hope large area faces were milled to obtain correct plate thickness

Posted 3 years by Anonymous 00:31:47

whats wrong with peck drilling?

Posted 3 years by Anonymous 00:39:32

should have used two parallels in vertical to begin with

Posted 3 years by Anonymous 00:40:04

You need to log in, in order to post comments. If you don’t have an account yet, sign up now!

Prototype Machining

Prototype Machining

Updated over 4 years ago

Created
April 07, 2008 14:05
Category
Tags
License
All Rights Reserved (What is this?)
Additional Files


Viewed
78046 times

More from Prototype Machining

Machine Shop 2

Machine Shop 2

Added over 6 years ago | 00:57:33 | 101506 views

Machine Shop 1

Machine Shop 1

Added over 6 years ago | 00:40:32 | 311818 views

Machine Shop 8

Machine Shop 8

Added over 6 years ago | 00:45:02 | 83248 views

Machine Shop 7

Machine Shop 7

Added over 6 years ago | 00:45:32 | 82283 views

Machine Shop 10

Machine Shop 10

Added over 6 years ago | 00:34:31 | 105363 views

Machine Shop 4

Machine Shop 4

Added over 6 years ago | 00:50:32 | 114206 views