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Machine Shop 10

Duration 34:32

Machine Shop 10 Lathe 3

1 Lathe Chuck
2 Lathe Arbors
3 Turning Between Centers
4 Face Plate Irregular Shapes
5 Face Plate Thin Materials

Comments (32)

Excellent series! In the example where a suspension part is clamped to the lathe faceplate, the extreme danger of the an off balance part should be pointed out with attention given to the starting RPM of the lathe.

Posted almost 6 years by Anonymous User

Once again VERY impressive! I had never seen nor thought of using double sided tape for sheet metal turning. Keep up the good work.

Posted almost 6 years by Anonymous User

Machine Shop 10 Lathe 3

1 Lathe Chuck 2 Lathe Arbors 3 Turning Between Centers 4 Face Plate Irregular Shapes 5 Face Plate Thin Materials

Posted almost 6 years by Anonymous User

Great series. Thank you for making this available for all to learn from.

Posted over 5 years by Anonymous

As a novice to the metal shop, these videos are invaluable. Thank you very much for sharing this king of information in a video format. I have uploaded it onto my PDA/Mobile phone, and can now watch the videos wherever I might be.

Posted over 5 years by Anonymous

Good information for me as I started making prototypes with no machine education or experience. Now I’m going back and learning something about operating mills and lathes.
I think I saw the videos are circa 1995. Do you now use cnc machines in your lab?

Posted over 5 years by Anonymous

Thank you so much for making this series of videos available to joe public. I’m very new to machining having recently bought an ex industrial Colchester lathe and a Bridgeport milling machine, I’ve learnt so much really useful info from your examples.

Posted over 5 years by Anonymous

great videos!…..as a beginning machinist, i learned alot. but….i can’t believe how cavalier thia guy is about putting his hands around running machinery. he strikes me as a math prof that got put in charge of the machine shop, and teaches thusly. i sure hope he doesn’t demonstrate this way to kids at college, cause’ those rich kids at MIT got daddys w/lawyers…i learned to keep my hands away from stuff in j.r. high metal shop, this guy’s probably too young to have had a j.r. high metal shop, so…a couple of times i almost couldn’t watch! i guess a video of this guy getting a finger whacked off w/a fly cutter wouldn’t have gone far….

Posted over 5 years by davesupreme

These are very clear, helpful videos. Thank you!

Posted 5 years by tsg

This entire series is indeed outstanding and well worthwhile watching for anyone with any interest in machining. It was not intended to teach machine shop, but to provide a very basic undrestanding and to hopefully to keep the inexperienced from losing body parts when making one off units. I even learned some new tricks in this series, but still contend that the most useful tool I own in the one that sits on my shoulders. Fancy CNC tools are no no more of a substitute for older machines than calculators and computers are a substitute for understanding math. Keep up this outstanding endeavor.
Al Sledge

Posted almost 5 years by al_sledge

what type of double sided tape name brand did you used on the face plate?

Posted 4 years by welafong1

great tool holder

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:11:25

great idea. now i can make round shims!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:28:19

This is a great set of machining videos! My hat is off to Mr Erik Vaaler and everyone involved that helped make these videos.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:29:02

sarcasm?

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:11:23

what the heck

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:03:20

That looks sharp!!!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:28:19

As he mentions in a moment, the tape is acting to drive the disc, the center provides the force required to keep the disc on the tape against the chuck. Of course if it let go it would be like a saw.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:03:13

You could also dry fit w/o tape, test run out with indicator, make witnessmarks, tape up and final adjust.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:06:27

They are both dead centres but a live one could be used on both ends.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:18:08

He’s actually using a dead center in both the headstock and tailstock. A dead center is inherently more accurate than a ball-bearing center.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:18:08

A lot of useful info

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:18:08

Got good support on the back of the work… but the washer is a little small to give a lot of support… I guess it doesn’t need it ???

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:15:32

Yep and I was just going to say something about the little dimple from the live center then he goes on to show how to prevent that too !!!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:06:09

VERY GOOD holding tip!!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:06:09

mark the centerpoint on the plate with a greasepencil or such, then take some scrap round stock like he was showing, drill a 1/8" hole through it, put a few very small pieces of double sided tape on the plate contact side of the donut. thread the donut on a bamboo skewer, align the skewer with the grease-spot on the large plate, then slide the donut on. now you have a centered piece of round that’s lightly taped onto the centerpoint of the plate, with a guidehole for the live center to grip into, and the plate you’re machining will have no permanent marks.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:06:27

how would we center the stock without the live center?

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:06:27

I wholeheartedly agree with you on that, being self taught myself I try to read as many books on machining as i can find but I have learned a lot!!! in these videos. I still don’t quite get it on the dead centers… why put the dead one in the tailstock and the live one in the headstock why not reverse that???

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:18:08

End!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:28:52

For some reason this doesn’t look like an awesome idea.

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:03:13

I agree, what the heck, the oil on the steel prob wont hold the disk!

Posted almost 4 years by Anonymous 00:03:33

ans: You’d have to start with a larger disc to ensure you could remove enough material to achieve a round outer edge. You can find the center offline on your layout bench.

Posted over 2 years by Anonymous 00:06:40

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Prototype Machining

Prototype Machining

Updated over 4 years ago

Created
April 07, 2008 14:26
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